Morris Micklewhite and the Tangerine Dress

Hardcover

Morris is a little boy who loves using his imagination. He dreams about having space adventures, paints beautiful pictures and sings the loudest during circle time. But most of all, Morris loves his classroom’s dress-up center — he loves wearing the tangerine dress.

But the children in Morris’s class don’t understand. Dresses, they say, are for girls. And Morris certainly isn’t welcome in the spaceship some of his classmates are building. Astronauts, they say, don’t wear dresses.

One day when Morris feels all alone, and sick from the taunts of his classmates, his mother lets him stay home from school. Morris reads about elephants, and puts together a puzzle, and dreams of a fantastic space adventure with his cat, Moo.

Inspired by his dream, Morris paints the incredible scene he saw, and brings it with him to school. He builds his own spaceship, hangs his painting on the front of it and takes two of his classmates on an outer space adventure.

Christine Baldacchino is a graphic artist and web designer with a background in early childhood education. She lives with her husband in Toronto. She likes cats and the colour orange. This is her first book.

Isabelle Malenfant has illustrated more than a dozen children’s books. Her illustration style mixes mediums such as watercolor, pastel and charcoal to create poetic and sensitive worlds. She lives with her family in Montreal.

 Rather than presenting an overt message about gender identity, the book provides a subtle and refreshing glimpse at a boy who simply likes to dress up. -- School Library Journal

Morris is a complex character whose creativity and personality shine. . . . Sensitive and reassuring. -- Kirkus, starred review

Unlike some more messagey titles on the subject, this one provides Morris with a personality beyond his dress-loving nature, making him enjoyable literary company. -- Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

Baldacchino's gentle story sensitively depicts gender nonconforming children, offering them reassurance and, one hopes, acceptance by introducing other children to the concept. -- Booklist





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